Unit Plan

Social Studies Unit Structure

Section 1

Unit Title

The Progressive Movement

Grade Level 11th grade/US History

Rationale / Abstract

A) Essential question to be explored

B) How and why the unit will be used?

C) Why is the unit significant/relevant?

D) How does the unit meet state and national standards

A)    What was the impact of the Progressive Movement, including child labor and antitrust laws, the use of labor unions, and the success of the women’s suffrage movement?

B)    This unit will be used to continue the study of America’s transition into a modern, industrial age in the decades following the Civil War.

C)    This unit is significant because many Progressive Era reforms still exist today, effecting student’s daily lives. Furthermore, much of the spirit of Progressivism persists today, in the form of grass roots organizations from across the ideological spectrum campaigning for government intervention to solve social ills.

D)    This unit meets both state and national standards:

SOLS

VUS.8d: The student will demonstrate knowledge of how the nation grew and changed from the end of Reconstruction through the early twentieth century by identifying the impact of the Progressive Movement, including child labor and antitrust laws, the use of labor unions, and the success of the women’s suffrage movement.

NCSS Standards

  1. I. Culture
  2. II. Time, Continuity, and Change
  3. V. Individuals, Groups, and Institutions

X.        Civic Ideals and Practices

Focus questions for the Unit
  1. What problems did urbanization and industrialization cause that the Progressives tried to fix?
  2. What were some of the major areas of reform the Progressives focused on?
  3. To what degree do we see the legacy of Progressivism in our own day?

Section 2

Unit Goals

(larger learnings from the focus questions and vice versa)

a) What will students understand as a result of this unit (Wiggins and McTighe levels of understanding).

Explanation: Students will know and identify the major goals of the Progressive Movement, specifically child labor and antitrust laws, the use of labor unions, the temperance movement, and the success of the women’s suffrage movement.

Interpretation: Students will be able to offer insight into the degree to which the Progressive Movement persists to this day and will connect contemporary reform crusades to Progressive campaigns.

Apply: Students will respond to a writing prompt where they argue whether or not health care reform can be considered a continuation of Progressive Movement ideas.

Perspective: Students will study the various aims of the major figures in Progressive Movement and be able to associate names with their associated causes.

Empathy: Students, by connecting their learning to what they feel and know about their worlds today, will feel some of the passion behind the Progressive Movement. This will be especially stressed during the women’s suffrage section.

Key concepts w/ definitions (min- 6) – Progressivism: a diverse movement between 1890-1920 that sought to reform American society

– muckraker: Journalists and authors who investigated and exposed poor social conditions and political corruption

– suffrage: the right to vote

– prohibition: laws banning the manufacture, sale, and consumption of alcohol

– Square Deal: President Theodore Roosevelt’s domestic program formed upon four basic ideas of “Conservation”, “Regulating Business Monopolies”, “Enforcing the Anti-Trust Act”, and “Supporting Progressive Ideas”.

– referendum: when proposed legislation is submitted to the voters for approval

– initiative: allowed citizens to introduce legislation and required the legislature to vote on it

– recall: allowed voters to demand a special election to remove an elected official from office before his term had expired

– direct election: the election of public officials by the people, rather than a state legislature

– trust:

– socialism: the idea that the government should own and operate industry for the community as a whole

strike: A cessation of work by employees in support of demands made on their employer

Section 3- Connecting Instruction

Unit Goals Benchmarks/ outcomes.   Objectives tied to NCSS standards and SOL’s Acceptable evidence- Assessment Task Learning Experiences and Instruction

Students will know and identify the major goals of the Progressive Movement, specifically child labor and antitrust laws, the use of labor unions, the temperance movement, and the success of the women’s suffrage movement.

The student will demonstrate knowledge of how the nation grew and changed from the end of Reconstruction through the early twentieth century by

d) identifying the impact of the Progressive Movement, including child labor and antitrust laws, the use of labor unions, and the success of the women’s

suffrage movement.

III. Culture

IV. Time, Continuity, and Change

VI. Individuals, Groups, and Institutions

X. Civic Ideals and Practices

Completed slot notes and answered questions on notes sheet.

Progressive acrostic group activity.

Unit test.

This information will be given to students through interactive lecture, video, experiential exercises, and group work.

Section 4- Resources

Resources (link to specific activity)

Web based resources

– Notes sheet for Lesson 1

– PowerPoint for Lesson 1

– Notes sheet for Lesson 2

– PowerPoint for Lesson 2

– Upton Sinclair video for Lesson 2

– Notes sheet for Lesson 3

– PowerPoint for Lesson 3

– Primary Source documents for Lesson 3 (100 copies)

– SCIM-C sheet for Lesson 3 (100 copies)

– Notes sheet for Lesson 4

– PowerPoint for Lesson 4

– Teddy Roosevelt video for Lesson 4

– Zip Around cards for Lesson 5

Section 5- Lesson Catalogue

Lesson 1.  Title

An Introduction to the Progressive Movement
Big Question What were the major causes and goals of the Progressive Movement?
Specific Objectives (transfer from above) 1. Students will understand how Industrialism caused problems in American society

2. Students will know the major targets of Progressive reforms.

Brief explanation of scope of lesson, significance, and explanation of tasks, and assessments An anticipatory set will activate student thinking on reform movements in their own communities. A lecture will then commence, introducing the students to the general concepts we’ll be studying and what we’ll be doing. The lecture will be broken up with three different pictures dedicated to visual discovery. Then, I will break the class up into groups to do the “First Letter” activity to check for understanding. I will conclude the class by returning to the guiding question

How are you trying to motivate students in your opener? What is your closure? Not only am I trying to stress “time, continuity, and change,” but I’m also hoping that my opening will let the students see the Progressives not as distant and inaccessible historical figures, but rather as people with concerns like them. The closures attempts to connect what we’ve learned with where we are going to go for the rest of the unit.

Lesson 2.  Title

To Rid Society of Evil
Big Question What social ills did the Progressives seek to address, and how successful were they?
Specific Objectives (transfer from above) 1. Students will know three of the major Progressive Reforms: temperance, food safety, child labor, and working conditions

Brief explanation of scope of lesson, significance, and explanation of tasks, and assessments An anticipatory set will be used to activate thinking on areas of government intervention to help the lives of citizens. Then a lecture will be presented introducing students to the campaigns for temperance, food safety, and better working conditions. Lecture will include a quick video about Upton Sinclair’s “The Jungle.” Students will then be directed to do a processing activity where they write a pamphlet representing one of the campaigns we’ve studied. We will close by talking about a few of the students pamphlets and reviewing the major topics as we return to the Guiding Question.

How are you trying to motivate students in your opener? What is your closure? The opener is meant to connect student’s thinking about government intervention now to the way the Progressives used it freely during the Progressive Era. My closure will give students a chance to show what they’ve learned as well as spin their answers to check for and make sure they have the correct understanding.

Lesson 3.  Title

Who Wants to End Women’s Suffrage?
Big Question How did Progressives achieve women’s suffrage?
Specific Objectives (transfer from above) 1. What were the goals of women suffragists during the Progressive Movement?

2. What were the major leaders of the movement?

3. How effective was the women’s movement in achieving its goals?

4. In what ways was the women’s suffrage movement a precursor to later women’s rights movements?

Brief explanation of scope of lesson, significance, and explanation of tasks, and assessments An anticipatory set will be presented which will cause students to consider the status of women’s rights/liberation today. A brief lecture will be presented, familiarizing the students with the women’s suffrage movement and the major leaders of it. Then, students will read primary sources by Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton. They will then do a SCIM-C in pairs. After debriefing it, I will close by briefly presenting later women’s movements and returning to the Guiding Question.

How are you trying to motivate students in your opener? What is your closure? My opening will try to emotionally connect student’s feelings about a current and pertinent issue to the Progressive Movement. My closure will try to connect the past to the present.

Lesson 4.  Title

Democratizing our Democracy
Big Question How did the Progressive Movement democratize the United States?
Specific Objectives (transfer from above) 1. Students will understand the democratic reforms undertaken during the Progressive Movement

2. Students will be able to identify the Progressive presidents and their major aims.

Brief explanation of scope of lesson, significance, and explanation of tasks, and assessments Students will complete an anticipatory set centered around their belief in individual freedom and political efficacy. A lecture will then be presented, along with student notes, about the democratic reforms and presidents of the Progressive Era. The lecture will be broken up with videos on Teddy Roosevelt as well as Think, Pair, Share activities. We will then return to the Guiding Question as to close.

How are you trying to motivate students in your opener? What is your closure? With the anticipatory set, I hope to connect student’s own ideas about the proper level of political efficacy in their own lives with the reforms aimed at brining government to the people during the Progressive Era. The closure aims to, by discussing our Guiding Question, have students understand why the democratic reforms were meaningful.

Lesson 5.  Title

A Review of the Progressive Era
Big Question What were the major causes and goals of the Progressive Movement?
Specific Objectives (transfer from above) 1. Students will understand how Industrialism caused problems in American society

2. Students will know the major targets of Progressive reforms.

3. Students will know the major figures of the Progressive Movement and what they stood for.

Brief explanation of scope of lesson, significance, and explanation of tasks, and assessments An anticipatory set will be presented, asking the students to define Progressivism and three of its major goals. Then, we will review by using the “Zip Around” strategy. After the zip around, students will be asked to write a short essay on what they believe the most important impact of the Progressive Era was. We will close by discussing our Guiding Question.

How are you trying to motivate students in your opener? What is your closure? The opener is meant to check for student understanding. I’m hoping to motivate students by allowing them to see some of their understandings which didn’t exist three days prior. With the closure I am hoping to wrap up the general themes we’ve been discussing all week.
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1 Comment

  1. Mini Lesson Reflection « teachdylan said,

    […] Here’s my unit plan […]

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